Leaving Birmingham: Notes of a Native Son (2020)

Leaving Birmingham Notes of a Native Son PBirmingham s history of racial violence and bigotry is the centerpiece of this intense and affecting memoir about family society and politics in a city still haunted by its notorious past In
  • Title: Leaving Birmingham: Notes of a Native Son
  • Author: Paul Hemphill
  • ISBN: 9780817310226
  • Page: 485
  • Format: Paperback
  • PBirmingham s history of racial violence and bigotry is the centerpiece of this intense and affecting memoir about family, society, and politics in a city still haunted by its notorious past In 1963, Birmingham was the scene of some of the worst racial violence of the civil rights era Police commissioner Bull Connor loosed dogs and turned fire hoses on black demonsPBirmingham s history of racial violence and bigotry is the centerpiece of this intense and affecting memoir about family, society, and politics in a city still haunted by its notorious past In 1963, Birmingham was the scene of some of the worst racial violence of the civil rights era Police commissioner Bull Connor loosed dogs and turned fire hoses on black demonstrators four young girls at Sunday school were killed when a bomb exploded in a black church and Martin Luther King, Jr wrote his famous letter from the Birmingham jail, defending his activism to fellow ministers.Birmingham native Paul Hemphill, disillusioned with his hometown, had left home to pursue a journalistic career, so he witnessed these historic events with the rest of the world through newspaper and television reports That grim old steel town, he writes, was the most blatantly segregated city of its size in the United States of America, and most of us regarded it with the same morbid fascination that causes us to slow down and gawk at a bloody wreck on the highway Thirty years later, Hemphill returned to Birmingham to explore the depths of change that had taken place in the decades since the violence In this powerful memoir, he interweaves his own autobiography with the history of the city and the stories of two very different Birmingham residents a wealthy white matron and the pastor of the city s largest black church As he struggles to come to terms with his own conflicting feelings toward his father s attitudes, Hemphill finds ironic justice in the integration of his childhood neighborhood and a visit with the black family who moved into his family s former home.
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      Posted by:Paul Hemphill
      Published :2020-04-23T09:15:06+00:00

    One Reply to “Leaving Birmingham: Notes of a Native Son”

    1. Paul Hemphill s Leaving Birmingham was recommended to me by historian and professor Bill Nicholas from Birmingham Southern College Every bit of this book is full of Birmingham history, even when native son Paul Hemphill is away from Birmingham This book also has many other people s stories, particularly Rev Rutland, a flaming wonderful Liberal Methodist Minister, long before the dog days of Bull Connor In fact, Rutland was Connor s minister at Woodlawn Methodist and chewed him out regularly He s [...]

    2. This book was extremely interesting to me, being a native of Birmingham several generations behind the civil rights movement It was a good read till I got to the end, then he got all choppy, like he didn t know how to end it and just threw in the last bits of information he had to make it look like he finished, but he never really did.Anyway, I m extremely dissapointed in my schooling on the history that went on right here where I grew up We learned VERY little about the civil rights struggles a [...]

    3. I read this book when I was living in New York City and was a little homesick I liked reading about places I was familiar with And, I agree with the author that Birmingham needs a shot in the arm It still does I met the author about a year ago and he is super nice.

    4. This book was an interesting look at what it have must have been like to grow up in a white working class family in Birmingham in the 1950 1960 s era Reading about the author s struggle to understand the racism that took hold of that city and in his own family and the revolution that took place in his own mind as he realized how very wrong it all was, made for a fascinating read What a struggle it was to continue to love and respect his father, who in all others ways seemed to be a good man, whi [...]

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