The Vanishing Stepwells of India (2020)

The Vanishing Stepwells of India Some of the most stunning architectural structures in India are to be found below ground these are its stepwells ancient water stores Stepwells are unique to India and from around the rd century CE
  • Title: The Vanishing Stepwells of India
  • Author: Victoria Lautman Divay Gupta
  • ISBN: 9781858946580
  • Page: 195
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Some of the most stunning architectural structures in India are to be found below ground these are its stepwells, ancient water stores Stepwells are unique to India and from around the 3rd century CE were built throughout the country, particularly in the arid western regions Excavated several stories underground in order to reach the water table, these cavernous spacesSome of the most stunning architectural structures in India are to be found below ground these are its stepwells, ancient water stores Stepwells are unique to India and from around the 3rd century CE were built throughout the country, particularly in the arid western regions Excavated several stories underground in order to reach the water table, these cavernous spaces not only provided water all year long but also fulfilled other functions they offered pilgrims and other travelers a respite from the heat, and became places in which villagers could socialize Stepwell construction evolved so that, by the 11th century, the wells were amazingly complex feats of architecture and engineering.The journalist Victoria Lautman first encountered stepwells three decades ago and now, a seasoned traveller to India, she has devoted several years to documenting these fascinating but largely unknown edifices before they disappear Of the thousands of stepwells that proliferated across India, most were abandoned as a result of modernization and the depletion of water tables Often commissioned by royal or wealthy patrons, the wells vary greatly in scale, layout, materials and shape Those in what is now Gujarat state also served as subterranean Hindu temples that featured columned pavilions and elaborate stone carvings of deities Islamic wells were generally less flamboyant, but incorporated arched side niches Today, few stepwells are in use The majority have been left to silt up, fill with rubbish and crumble into disrepair Gradually, however, the Indian government and heritage organizations have come to recognize the need to preserve these architectural wonders In 2014 India s best known stepwell, the Rani ki Vav in Patan, northern Gujarat, became a UNESCO World Heritage site.In her introduction, Lautman discusses why and where the stepwells were built She reflects on the reasons they became derelict and considers how the appreciation of stepwells is changing with the work of organizations and individuals who aim to protect and restore them The main part of the book is arranged in a broadly chronological order, with up to six pages devoted to each of c 80 stepwells, every one unique in design and engineering The name, location including GPS coordinates and approximate date of each well accompany color photographs and a concise commentary by Lautman on the history and architecture of the well and her experience of visiting it While many of the stepwells are rather decrepit, their magnificent engineering and great beauty cannot fail to impress.
    Photos Capture India s Ancient, Vanishing Stepwells Apr , The Vanishing Stepwells of India Lautman has been a journalist for over years, with a focus on arts and culture She received an M.A in art history and worked at the Smithsonian Institution s The Vanishing Stepwells of India Lautman, Victoria, Gupta Mar , The journalist Victoria Lautman first encountered stepwells three decades ago and now, a seasoned traveller to India, she has devoted several years to documenting these fascinating but largely unknown edifices before they disappear. India s hidden subterranean stepwells captured in photos Called The Vanishing Stepwells of India, the project was completed by Chicago based journalist Victoria Lautman over the course of seven years, and saw her exploring different parts of India to discover about the background of the unique ancient structures Also known as baolis, vavs and kunds in various parts of the country, stepwells are manufactured storage The Vanishing Stepwells of India SUITCASE Magazine S tepwells evolved in response to India s dramatic climate which is bone dry most of the year with intermittent monsoon rains Establishing a reliable water supply all year long was imperative, particularly in regions where the water table could be many stories underground at its lowest ebb. The Vanishing Stepwells of India A New Book by Victoria Mar , In an attempt to preserve their legacy, Lautman has gathered a visual tour of of the unique and interesting wells in a new book titled The Vanishing Stepwells of India The book includes not only her original photography, but also her impressions about each well and the precise GPS coordinates of their locations. The Astonishing Vanishing Stepwells of India ArchDaily Descending into the subterranean space only augmented the disorientation, with telescoping views and ornate, towering columns that paraded five stories into the earth At the bottom,
    • [EPUB] ☆ The Vanishing Stepwells of India | by Î Victoria Lautman Divay Gupta
      195 Victoria Lautman Divay Gupta
    • thumbnail Title: [EPUB] ☆ The Vanishing Stepwells of India | by Î Victoria Lautman Divay Gupta
      Posted by:Victoria Lautman Divay Gupta
      Published :2020-05-12T04:09:18+00:00

    One Reply to “The Vanishing Stepwells of India”

    1. As the term denotes, stepwells are steps means of access to wells, below surface or underground sources of water mostly in western India s arid regions Gujarat north of Mumbai is noted as one such area Cistern is a Western term giving the idea of the geographical water feature that is the focus of and basically the reason for a stepwell though cistern does not begin to bring to mind the larger purposes of a stepwell and especially in line with the interest of this book, the architecture of stepw [...]

    2. 3.75 5.0Encyclopedia of a phenomenon I had no idea existed Nice pictures and brief description Tough angles for photography but still would have been nice if they were a touch better and tied directly to notes in text Certainly would benefit from an comprehensive historical study I can envision a wonderful history 0f India built around the inspiration and construction of these unique monuments.

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